Would YOU stop eating meat to support a vegan or vegetarian partner? – Daily Mail

Restaurant News

Would YOU stop eating meat to support a vegan partner? Research shows 20% of people who ditch burgers and steaks do so to keep their relationship happy

  • Vegan food brand polled 2,000 people about why they’d decided to ditch meat
  • 18 per cent of those polled said they changed their diet to support their partners
  • One third admitted they would have kept tucking into meat if they weren’t in a relationship with a non-meat eater
  • 34 per cent of adults who’d turned vegan or veggie admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time 

Brits are much more likely to stop eating meat if their other half is vegan or vegetarian, according to new research. 

One in five former meat-eaters said they’d made the decision to ditch burgers and steaks to support their partner.

A study, carried out by vegan food brand The Fry Family Co, asked 2,000 veggies or vegans what inspired them to stop consuming meat or animal-based products, and nearly 20 per cent admitted their decision was led by their love lives.

One third of the people polled said that they wouldn’t have made the switch if they had not received encouragement from their partners in the first place.

Scroll down for video 

A study carried out by vegan brand The Fry Family Co, found that 18 per cent ditched meat or animal-based products to keep their other half happy or to support their lifestyle (stock image)

A study carried out by vegan brand The Fry Family Co, found that 18 per cent ditched meat or animal-based products to keep their other half happy or to support their lifestyle (stock image)

Encouragement didn’t just come from partners though, as the data collected also showed that 16 per cent made changes after their children requested the change and 19 per cent said they were convinced by friends to change their diet.

Tammy Fry, representing the brand, said: ‘Our research shows that when it comes to trying out a plant-based diet, encouragement from partners, family and friends can be really helpful.

‘Whether it’s sharing experiences, advice or handy meal tips, talking to loved ones about the benefits of swapping to a meat-free diet can go a long way in encouraging others to reduce their meat or dairy consumption.

‘When it comes to taking steps towards a meat-free diet, it doesn’t have to be ‘all or nothing’ – you can simply start by making easy swaps once or twice-a-week.

One third of the people polled said that they wouldn't have made the switch if they had not received encouragement from their partners in the first place (stock image)

One third of the people polled said that they wouldn’t have made the switch if they had not received encouragement from their partners in the first place (stock image)

‘It’s never been easier to introduce meat-free options into your diet without compromising the taste, or quality, of your meal.’

The study also found that eight out of ten people who made the change found it easier than they’d thought it would be and 53 per cent admitted to feeling healthier and more energetic.

Despite this, seven per cent of those polled found ditching meat difficult and said they were faced with a lack of choice when eating out and cooking. 

34 per cent of adults admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time and 28 per cent of those polled said it was hard to convince the entire family and find a takeaway.

And 23 per cent of those people who gave up their plant-based diet admitted they would consider trying again (stock image)

And 23 per cent of those people who gave up their plant-based diet admitted they would consider trying again (stock image)

Fry Family Food Co conducted a second poll of 1,000 adults and found that 46 per cent had tried a vegetarian or plant-based diet at some point and of that proportion, 49 per cent had done so for a partner.

However, the average person only kept the lifestyle going for 19 weeks and for one in 20, the main reason for reverting to meat was their relationship ending.

23 per cent of those people who gave up the plant-based diet admitted they would consider trying again.

In response to their polls, The Fry Family Food Co challenged four meat-lovers to try their plant-based range to see if they could tell the difference.

Pangs: 34 per cent of adults admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time (stock image)

Pangs: 34 per cent of adults admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time (stock image)

Alice De-Warrenne, from London, who initially believed nothing could taste as good as, or replace the flavour of meat, said: ‘I’m still a meat lover, but I’m definitely open to trying new things.

‘This did not taste how I expected it to, especially the Meat-Free Chicken Nuggets. I would happily have those every day.’ 

Tammy Fry added: ‘Our research has revealed that those who follow a plant-based diet feel healthier, have more energy, and most importantly, found the change in the diet far easier to adapt to than they could have imagined.

‘We’re keen to encourage as many people as possible to try going meat-free, even if it’s just making an easy swap once or twice a week.’

To encourage people to make an easy swap themselves, The Fry Family Food Co is giving away a years’ worth of Meat-Free Chicken-Style Nuggets, if they pledge to make an easy swap to plant-based at least once a week.

Advertisement

Source: Thanks https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8810077/Would-stop-eating-meat-support-vegan-vegetarian-partner.html